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Home » Peace Lily Propagation

Peace Lily Propagation

by Elyssa Goins
This article was fact checked.
Helpful: 100%

Propagating a peace lily is fairly straight forward and achieved through dividing sections of the mother plant. It’s really up to you how many plants you would like to divide and grow, although the amount will depend on the size of your plant and how many crowns it has.

Check for crowns: I probably would have preferred to use a plant which had matured more, however, the lily used here has plenty of good crowns to separate. I’m only going to divide this plant into three because it’s quite young, but I could separate more.


Remove from pot: Take your mother plant out of it’s present pot by leaning the plant to the side and try to keep all the foliage together. If your plant is stuck inside the pot, tapping the side of the pot usually frees it.


Dividing: You can now divide the plant by taking a crown section away from the mother plant by hand gently, or cut sections away with a sharp knife. This lily did not need a knife used and separated easily. The crown needs to have 2 or more leaves and have roots attached to be propagated successfully.


Prepare: You have a number of plants including the mother plant that you will need to prepare for potting up. Check the roots and foliage, and remove any loose parts of the roots or leaves that have brown tips. You are now ready to pot.


Potting up: Four inch pots are a suitable size to use when potting up, and need to be filled with a peat based potting mix (well draining mix). If your soil is already very moist you wont need to water the plant, but if it’s dry then water thoroughly.


Aftercare: And, then there was three…Peace lilies enjoy bright light, a good watering and being fed once a month. You do not need to use fertilizer for the next 2 months, though.


Items and Tools Needed

  • A healthy plant with crowns.
  • Sharp knife or pruning shears.
  • Newspaper (keeping area clean).
  • 3 – 4 inch pots.
  • Peat based potting soil.
  • Water (maybe, if soil is not already moist).

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Jessica Harris
Jessica Harris
1 year ago

Hi, I’m wondering why you have to use a peat-based soil? I have been trying to not use peat-based products for environmental reasons. Is it really necessary for some reason in this application? Thank you!

Mary Lloyster
Mary Lloyster
Reply to  Jessica Harris
1 year ago

Peat soil is a type of soil made from decomposed organic materials that form over thousands of years, and yes, it is bad for the environment, but for some reasons, peat soil can be good for some plants. It is typically acidic, it provides good root structure, and it holds a lot of water. So, plants that love moisture and don’t mind acidic conditions can grow well in peat soil. And it is not necessary to use peat soil; it is still about the convenience of your method for growing your plants. Thank you for that wonderful reminder to everyone who is a plant parent and to those who want to start collecting plants. Grow more with plants!

Roma Lloyd
Roma Lloyd
1 year ago

This has been very helpful. I live in zone 7b, is there a certain time of year to separate my indoor Peace Lily?

Green Christine
Green Christine
1 year ago

If the roots are very long can you trim them a little? I’ve had a huge peace Lily in a large water vase soaking and the roots went crazy.

Mary Lloyster
Reply to  Green Christine
8 months ago

Sure can, 25% of the root mass can be removed safely.

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